2010 Decks

Abomasnow / Ampharos:

Abomasnow Ampharos
Photo Credit – Jonathan Paranada
Pokémon (25) Trainers (21) Energy (14)
4x Pokemon Collector
3x Cynthia’s Feelings
3x Bebe’s Search
2x Underground Expedition
1x Copycat
1x Judge
3x Rare Candy
2x Pokemon Communication
1x Luxury Ball
1x Warp Point
4x Water Energy
4x Double Colorless Energy
4x Call Energy
2x Lightning Energy
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Making T16 at the World Championships, Morten Gundesen took many by surprise with this interesting spread deck. Spiritomb allowed it to setup consistently while slowing down the opponent, while Ampharos’s Damage bind would lock many decks relying on Poke-Powers in the later game. The thick Abomasnow line allowed a constant barrage of spread attacks as well as paralysis aided by the release of Double Colorless Energy.

 

 

CurseGar:

13. Cursegar

Pokémon (24) Trainers (25) Energy (11)
3x Judge
3x Roseanne’s Research
2x Pokemon Collector
2x Bebe’s Search
2x Felicity’s Drawing
3x Rare Candy
2x Warp Point
2x Expert Belt
2x Pokemon Communication
1x Night Maintenance
1x Luxury Ball
2x Moonlight Stadium
5x Psychic Energy
4x Call Energy
2x Warp Energy
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Frank Diaz used this list to both Grind into Worlds, and finish 3rd at the main event. The early game involves setting up your board quickly with Spiritomb’s Darkness Grace while slowing your opponent down with its Keystone Seal Poke-Body. It then wants to spread early damage with Gengar’s Shadow Room, while trying to set up the other Gengar to Shadow Skip. This eventually allows you to both hit for 80 each turn with Expert Belt, while leaving a Trainer locking Spiritomb active at the end of each turn, ontop of all the small damage modifications and tricks the deck offers.

 

 

DialgaChomp:

2. DialgaChomp

Pokémon (21) Trainers (27) Energy (12)
4x Cyrus’s Conspiracy
3x Pokemon Collector
2x Bebe’s Search
1x Judge
1x Aaron’s Collection
4x TGI Poke Turn
3x TGI Energy Gain
2x TGI Power Spray
2x TGI SP Radar
1x Pokemon Communication
1x Night Maintenance
1x Expert Belt
1x Warp Point
1x Switch
4x Double Colorless Energy
3x Metal Energy (SP)
2x Metal Energy
2x Psychic Energy
1x Warp Energy
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DialgaChomp saw a decent amount of play throughout the season, and Kyle Sucevich managed to pilot it to a T4 finish at US Nationals. Dialga G’s powerful Deafen attack slowed your opponent down enough for you to set up your own board. The end goal was usually to build up a tanky Dialga G Lv.X with Special Metal Energies and an Expert Belt, making it hard for your opponent to deal with. Garchomp C Lv.X’s Healing Breath also allowed you to continuously heal Dialga for little cost, while also sniping any threats on the bench with Dragon Rush.

 

 

Donphan:

10. Donphan

Pokémon (21) Trainers (28) Energy (11)
4x Pokemon Collector
3x Bebe’s Search
3x Judge
1x Roseanne’s Research
1x Felicity’s Drawing
4x Super Scoop Up
3x Pokemon Communication
2x Expert Belt
1x Bench Shield
1x Warp Point
1x Luxury Ball
1x Night Maintenance
3x Stark Mountain
7x Fighting Energy
4x Multi Energy
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This deck focused on Donphan’s ability to hit hard quickly, and ability to survive multiple hits. The combination of Stark Mountain and Super Scoop Up allowed it to both get maximum value out of cards like Expert Belt, but set up game swinging turns involving cards like Entei & Raikou Legend. As it didn’t need much to set up and keep going, it played high copies of cards like Judge to try to stunt the opponent’s setup as much as possible. Manectric doubled as an alternative attacker as well as a way to prevent you damaging your own bench with its Electric Barrier Poke-Body.

 

 

Flygon / Torterra:

Evan Cole Flyterra
Photo Credit – Evan Cole
Pokémon (26) Trainers (20) Energy (14)
4x Bebe’s Search
4x Roseanne’s Research
4x Rare Candy
3x Expert Belt
2x Pokemon Communication
1x Luxury Ball
1x Night Maintenance
1x Memory Berry
4x Double Colorless Energy
4x Grass Energy
3x Call Energy
2x Psychic Energy
1x Fighting Energy
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David Sturm won Germany Nationals with this deck and went on to reach T32 of the World Championships. It focused on slowly building towards an end game of a tanky Torterra with an Expert Belt healing 60 damage a turn with Giga Drain, while having 180HP and Nidoqueen’s Maternal Comfort healing even more. Flygon provided an alternate attacker and manoeuvrability throughout the game. This list is a modernised take on the deck by Evan Cole from this article.

 

 

Garchomp SV:

15. Garchomp

Pokémon (22) Trainers (27) Energy (11)
4x Bebe’s Search
2x Pokemon Collector
2x Roseanne’s Research
2x Judge
1x Palmer’s Contribution
4x Rare Candy
2x Pokemon Communication
2x Expert Belt
2x Pokemon Reversal
2x Warp Point
1x TGI Poke Turn
1x Luxury Ball
2x Broken Time Space
4x Double Colorless Energy
4x Call Energy
2x Cyclone Energy
1x Psychic Energy
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Mark Garcia took this rogue archetype to a surprising T8 finish at US Nationals. The release of Double Colorless Energy and Expert Belt made both Guard Claw and Speed Impact very strong attacks for low energy costs which could often OHKO other Pokemon in the format efficiently. Garchomp’s high HP also proved to be troublesome for the formats general reliance on low damaging but disruptive attacks. Cards like Cyclone Energy, Pokemon Reversal and Warp point tried to ensure that you had a constant favourable prize trade, taking cheap knockouts each turn, while also comboing well with Dusknoir’s Dark Palm.

 

 

Gardevoir / Gallade:

6. Gardevoir Gallade

Pokémon (25) Trainers (22) Energy (13)
4x Bebe’s Search
4x Roseanne’s Research
2x Looker’s Investigation
1x Judge
1x Lucian’s Assignment
3x Rare Candy
2x Expert Belt
2x Moonlight Stadium
1x Warp Point
1x Night Maintenance
1x Luxury Ball
5x Psychic Energy
4x Double Colorless Energy
3x Call Energy
1x Fighting Energy
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Argued to be the true best deck in format, Gardevoir returned to its former glory in 2008 with the release of cards like Expert Belt, Spiritomb and Double Colorless Energy. Spiritomb slowed down your opponent in the early turns while setting up your board quickly with the goal to start locking your opponent out of Poke-Powers with Gardevoir’s Psychic Lock attack. Telepass and Claydol gave the deck insane consistency in the mid-late game and dealing 80 a turn while locking Poke-Powers would eventually be too much for decks to handle.

 

 

Gliscor:

17. Gliscor

Pokémon (26) Trainers (30) Energy (4)
4x Pokemon Collector
4x Roseanne’s Research
2x Bebe’s Search
2x Cynthia’s Feelings
1x Palmer’s Contribution
4x TGI Poke Turn
3x Time-Space Distortion
2x PokeGear 3.0
2x Switch
1x Premier Ball
1x Luxury Ball
4x Broken Time Space
4x Call Energy
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This deck started appearing and performing well at smaller events earlier in the season especially against unprepared opponents. It focused on setting up a perfect lock using Gliscor Lv.X’s Shoot Poison Poke-Power, then using Gliscor’s Burning Poison to return the cards to the hand while promoting a Spiritomb to prevent the opponent playing trainers. Unfortunately this strategy relied too heavily on a single Poke-Power, and a lot of decks had answers to prevent this like Mesprit, Power Spray or Gardevoir’s Psychic Lock. The lock could also be broken with hand disruption Supporters like Judge or Looker’s Investigation.

 

 

Gyarados:

1. Gyarados

Pokémon (23) Trainers (33) Energy (4)
4x Sableye
3x Gyarados
4x Magikarp
2x Uxie
2x Crobat G
1x Luxray GL Lv.X
1x Luxray GL
1x Regice
1x Combee
1x Mesprit
1x Azelf
1x Azelf
1x Unown Q
4x Pokemon Collector
4x Felicity’s Drawing
2x Bebe’s Search
1x Judge
1x Cynthia’s Feelings
4x Pokemon Rescue
4x Super Scoop Up
4x TGI Poke Turn
3x Expert Belt
1x VS Seeker
1x Luxury Ball
4x Broken Time Space
3x Warp Energy
1x Cyclone Energy
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Continuing to perform well throughout the season after its surprise appearance at the 2009 World Championships, Gyarados only got stronger with the release of Expert Belt – allowing it to hit a whopping 110 damage for 0 energy and 150HP on a stage 1. The AMU lock continued to grow stronger as the format seemingly relied more on Basic Pokemon, especially Pokemon SP. Sableye allowed the deck to setup consistently and quickly, and Felicity’s Drawing and Regice allowed you to get Magikarps into the discard pile to power up Tail Revenge.

 

 

Jumpluff:

7. Jumpluff

Pokémon (26) Trainers (28) Energy (6)
3x Bebe’s Search
3x Roseanne’s Research
2x Pokemon Collector
1x Judge
4x Pokemon Communication
4x TGI Poke Turn
3x Rare Candy
1x Night Maintenance
1x Warp Point
1x Expert Belt
1x Luxury Ball
4x Broken Time Space
4x Grass Energy
2x Multi Energy
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Performing particularly well in lower age groups, this deck focused on rushing down the opponent with a quick Mass Attack from Jumpluff – often as early as turn 1. The efficiency of the attack made it easier to focus on setting up multiple Jumpluffs with the help of Claydol’s Cosmic Power, with the hope to overwhelm the opponent and take easy prizes. Luxray GL Lv.X allowed you to either target down potential threats or take cheap prizes throughout the game.

 

 

Kingdra:

14. Kingdra

Pokémon (18) Trainers (31) Energy (7)
3x Kingdra Prime
1x Kingdra
2x Seadra LA
4x Horsea LA
1x Donphan
1x Phanpy SW
1x Dusknoir
1x Duskull SH2
3x Claydol
3x Baltoy
2x Uxie
4x Roseanne’s Research
4x Bebe’s Search
2x Judge
1x Palmer’s Contribution
4x Rare Candy
4x Pokemon Communication
4x Warp Point
3x Expert Belt
1x Luxury Ball
4x Broken Time Space
4x Water Energy
2x Multi Energy
1x Fighting Energy
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Performing particularly well at US Nationals, this deck took advantage of low attack costs with high damage outputs like Kingdra’s Dragon Steam or Donphan’s Earthquake. This combined with their high HP and cards like Judge to disrupt their opponent usually gave it a strong matchup against the formats shift to low HP and low damage output attackers. Kingdra’s Spray Splash allowed you to set up key numbers and increase the general damage output of the deck.

 

 

LuxChomp:

3. LuxChomp

Pokémon (21) Trainers (26) Energy (13)
4x Cyrus’s Conspiracy
3x Roseanne’s Research
1x Bebe’s Search
1x Aaron’s Collection
4x TGI Poke Turn
3x TGI Energy Gain
3x TGI SP Radar
3x TGI Power Spray
3x Pokemon Communication
1x VS Seeker
4x Call Energy
4x Double Colorless Energy
3x Lightning Energy
1x Fire Energy
1x Psychic Energy
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Arguably the most popular deck of the format, and winning both the Masters and Seniors age group at Worlds, LuxChomp was the consistently the deck to beat. It’s aggression with low cost attacks, disruptive abilities and ability to target the bench made it difficult for most decks to keep up. It had a lot of possible techs to include to improve most matchups and hit for key weaknesses against the format too. The deck could also switch gears to more of a control focused deck especially against other SP decks.

 

 

Magnezone:

16. Magnezone

Pokémon (23) Trainers (23) Energy (14)
4x Spiritomb
1x Magnezone Lv.X
2x Magnezone
1x Magnezone Promo
2x Magneton
4x Magnemite
2x Claydol
2x Baltoy
1x Blissey
1x Chansey
1x Uxie
1x Azelf
1x Unown Q
3x Roseanne’s Research
2x Pokemon Collector
2x Bebe’s Search
2x Felicity’s Drawing
2x Judge
3x Pokemon Communication
3x Rare Candy
2x Expert Belt
2x Warp Point
1x Luxury Ball
1x Night Maintenance
8x Lightning Energy
4x Metal Energy
2x Warp Energy
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Functioning similarly to CurseGar, Magnezone could use Gyro Ball with an Expert Belt to deal 80 damage a turn while retreating into Spiritomb to Trainer lock the opponent. Magnezone Lv.X provided a higher damage cap while also paralysing the opponent as well. Magnezone saw success particularly in international tournaments, winning Finland’s National Championships and reaching T8 at Mexico Nationals. Evan Cole brought light back to this archetype recreating a list similar to this.

 

 

Regigigas:

9. Regigigas

Pokémon (20) Trainers (26) Energy (14)
3x Pokemon Collector
3x Roseanne’s Research
3x Felicity’s Drawing
2x Judge
1x Bebe’s Search
4x Super Scoop Up
2x Pokemon Communication
2x Warp Point
2x Time Space Distortion
2x Expert Belt
1x Premier Ball
1x VS Seeker
4x Double Colorless Energy
3x Water Energy
3x Metal Energy
3x Fighting Energy
1x Psychic Energy
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Regigigas saw limited play throughout the season, partially due to the difficulty of both creating a good list, and also learning how to play each matchup correctly. Despite this, it’s considered a top contender in hindsight by many players. The main focus of the deck is to tank with a Regigigas Lv.X with an Expert Belt, while repeatedly locking your opponent out of Poke-Powers with Mesprit’s Psychic Bind. Regigigas’s Sacrifice Poke-Power would then both setup it’s main attack, heal itself and clear a bench space all in one. It had a lot of tricks up its sleeve however, including using Drag off with an Expert belt to OHKO or 2HKO bench sitters with ease like Garchomp C or Claydol.

 

 

Sablock:

5. Sablelock

Pokémon (21) Trainers (28) Energy (11)
4x Cyrus’s Conspiracy
2x Pokemon Collector
2x Judge
2x Cyrus’s Initiative
1x Bebe’s Search
1x Aaron’s Collection
1x Felicity’s Drawing
4x TGI Poke Turn
4x TGI Power Spray
3x TGI Energy Gain
2x TGI SP Radar
1x Luxury Ball
1x VS Seeker
4x Double Colorless Energy
4x Darkness Energy
2x Dark Energy
1x Psychic Energy
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Sablock was popularised by Con Le after winning US Nationals and going on to reach T16 at the World Championships. As the name implies, it focused on starting Sableye to disrupt the opponent starting from Turn 1, or even just get a cheap donk. Failing this however, it aimed to lock the opponent out of the game turn 1 by using Impersonate to copy a disruptive Supporter like Cyrus’s Initiative or Judge or just set up its own board. Garchomp C Lv.X allowed the deck to further stunt any slow setups by picking off any potential threats before they had a chance to establish, or just take cheap prizes.

 

 

Shuppet Donk:

11. Shuppet Donk

Pokémon (19) Trainers (37) Energy (4)
3x Uxie
1x Shuppet
1x Dunsparce
4x Unown R
3x Crobat G
2x Unown Q
2x Mr. Mime
1x Mankey
1x Regice
1x Mamoswine GL
4x Pokemon Collector
2x Buck’s Training
4x Poke Blower +
4x Poke Drawer +
4x Pokedex Handy910is
4x Super Scoop Up
4x Pluspower
4x TGI Poke Turn
2x Warp Point
2x Time-Space Distortion
2x Expert Belt
1x Luxury Ball
3x Rainbow Energy
1x Psychic Energy
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As the name suggests, this deck aimed to take advantage of the limiting turn 1 rules and attempt to donk your opponents Pokemon on the first turn. It tried to fit as many cards that would either increase your damage output, or increase your consistency to pull this off. Failing this, the deck still had a “Hit and Run” strategy where you would do as much damage as possible with Expert Belts, Pluspowers and other damage modifiers, then go into a wall like Mr. Mime or Mamoswine.

 

 

Steelix:

12. Steelix

Pokémon (14) Trainers (32) Energy (14)
4x Professor Oak’s New Theory
4x Engineer’s Adjustments
3x Volkner’s Philosophy
3x Judge
4x Life Herb
4x Moomoo Milk
4x Pokemon  Communication
3x Pluspower
2x Expert Belt
1x Luxury Ball
4x Call Energy
4x Double Colorless Energy
4x Metal Energy (SP)
2x Metal Energy
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Erik Nance managed to make a surprisingly deep run with this rogue Steelix deck at the World Championships. It tried to take advantage of the formats lack of high damage output and reliance on shutting down Poke-Powers by not relying on any itself. Steelix would slowly build up to be too bulky to knockout with Special Metal Energy, Life Herb and Moomoo Milk, while dealing lots of damage each turn with Gaia Crush in combination with an Expert Belt. Unfortunately he faced one of the few answers, Infernape 4 Lv.X, in T32 and couldn’t overcome the weakness.

 

 

Tyranitar:

4. Tyranitar

Pokémon (25) Trainers (23) Energy (12)
4x Roseanne’s Research
3x Bebe’s Search
2x Judge
1x Lucian’s Assignment
1x Palmer’s Contribution
3x Rare Candy
2x Expert Belt
1x VS Seeker
1x Luxury Ball
1x Memory Berry
2x Broken Time Space
2x Moonlight Stadium
4x Double Colorless Energy
3x Darkness Energy
3x Dark Energy
2x Psychic Energy
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Played by Colin Peterik at US Nationals, this deck aimed to tank with a high HP Tyranitar Prime with the aid of Expert Belt and Nidoqueen’s Maternal Comfort. Darkness Howl provided a strong early spread attack to setup numbers, while Double Colorless made Megaton Tail and Ruthless Tail easy to setup. Shedinja gave the deck an answer to Donphan Prime.

 

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